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What is photo-damaged skin?

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  • What is photo-damaged skin?

    Please explain if u know...
    TIA

  • #2
    I believe it means skin that has suffered sun damage, which can manifest itself in different ways:

    - pigmentation, uneven skintone
    - loss of elasticity, firmness
    - wrinkles
    - coarse, dry skin texture
    - sometimes excessively oily skin (overproduction of sebum)

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    • #3
      Oh! no, i think i have photo-damaged skin then... argh~~
      thanks pan~~

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      • #4
        Originally posted by pandora76

        - pigmentation, uneven skintone
        eeks! that's me!
        then again i think the pigmentation could be due to the BCP more rather than the sun.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by babyflite
          eeks! that's me!
          then again i think the pigmentation could be due to the BCP more rather than the sun.
          Babyflite, what is BCP??
          :sotong:

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          • #6
            BCP = contraceptive pill

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            • #7
              I c. I think Aging problem is mainly caused by the Sun also. UVA light causes aging, UVB light causes cell damaging - dehydrating, sunburn etc.

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              • #8
                Saresha surely is the one to share her knowledge on this topic. I reckon it's about similar to sun damage?

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                • #9
                  I got this info from Yahoo Search, maybe u all can read on this and know more about photo-damaged skin. According to their research, Asians are not as easy as Caucasians got wrinkles after long sun - exposure, but hyperpigmentation cannot be avoided.


                  Cochrane Skin Group


                  Interventions for photodamaged skin

                  Samuel M, Griffiths C E M

                  CSG Home Page


                  Background
                  The alterations in the structural and functional components of the skin as a result of prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation are collectively referred to as photodamage, dermatoheliosis or photoageing. Most of the clinical features of photodamage were thought to be those of chronological ageing i.e. age spots (actinic lentigines) and wrinkles. It is predicted that current lifestyle changes of increased skin exposure to the sun and artificial uv sources and consequent chronic effects of ultraviolet radiation (UV) on skin will result in an increasing number of photodamaged patients requesting treatment to improve their disordered skin.

                  In the general population, differences in photodamage will depend on skin types (e.g., a fair skin will be photodamaged more easily than a dark skin) and changes in pigmentation seem to be a more important feature than wrinkling in prematurely aged skin. These differences may possibly be because of inherent differences in sun exposure of individuals and natural defence mechanisms against chronic exposure to sun. Studies have shown that Caucasians and Asians have different phenotypes of photodamage. Asians primarily have hyperpigmented lesions and only a small degree of wrinkling after years of sun exposure, while the Caucasians display both wrinkling and hyperpigmentation (Weiss et al-,1988; Goh, 1990; Griffiths et al., 1994). The difference is fundamentally due to the melanocyte function (pigment production) although the ratio of melanocytes to keratinocytes (1:36) is constant in all races. Cigarette smoking has also been shown to cause an acute decrease in capillary and arteriolar blood flow in the skin, perhaps damaging connective tissue components that are important to maintaining the integrity of the skin (Grady and Ernster, 1992)

                  Chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation causes characteristic alterations in the cellular components of skin (Gilchrest, 1992). Some of the clinical signs of photodamage, which include fine and coarse wrinkling, pigmentary changes, roughness, laxity, sallowness and telangiectasia (prominent fine blood vessels), lead to the appearance of premature ageing and can have a significant impact on certain aspects of quality of life (Gupta & Gupta, 1996). Histologically, epidermal atrophy and dysplasia, dermal elastosis and increased melanocyte activity are observed. Dysplastic and neoplastic changes such as actinic keratoses and basal and squamous cell carcinomas are also extreme features of photodamaged skin.

                  Although ageing has been thought to be irreversible, studies made during the last decade have shown that some topical compounds and surgical procedures can improve age-related skin damage (Griffiths et al., 1995; Roger & Fuleihan, 1995; Pierard et al., 1996, Pierard et al 1997). Surgical treatments include face-lifts, dermabrasion, laser re-surfacing, botulinum toxin and collagen injection and chemical peeling. These surgical treatments produce clinical and histological improvement in photodamaged skin but are not without risk and contain no element of prevention. Drug treatment on the other hand consists of sunscreens, retinoids, antioxidants including vitamin C and E and beta-carotene, alpha-hydroxyacids and oestrogen (Humphreys et al., 1996; Thibault et al., 1998; Weiss et al 198. A variety of topical prescription and nonprescription agents are widely available for improving photodamaged skin, the efficacy of which is unclear. Therefore, given the large number of treatments of unknown efficacy, it is vital for us to identify those surgical procedures and compounds that are effective and safe for therapy of photodamage.

                  [FONT=century gothic][COLOR=purple][I]

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Shon
                    I got this info from Yahoo Search, maybe u all can read on this and know more about photo-damaged skin.

                    Surgical treatments include face-lifts, dermabrasion, laser re-surfacing, botulinum toxin and collagen injection and chemical peeling. These surgical treatments produce clinical and histological improvement in photodamaged skin but are not without risk and contain no element of prevention. Drug treatment on the other hand consists of sunscreens, retinoids, antioxidants including vitamin C and E and beta-carotene, alpha-hydroxyacids and oestrogen (Humphreys et al., 1996; Thibault et al., 1998; Weiss et al 198.
                    Microdermabrasion and Vitamin C for treatment? Then I'm on the right track!!

                    Thanks for the detailed info Shon!

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                    • #11
                      Welcome, Pan.
                      But the Microdermabrasion and Vitamin C treatments are not cheap, right? (I mean in Derma -X also)

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                      • #12
                        i have pigmentation too...

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Blossom
                          i have pigmentation too...
                          What kind of pigmentation? Me mostly b'coz of the acne... After the breakouts , lot of scars leave. On and off non-stop .....

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