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  • Relationships with Superiors

    i am facing a similar situation. workloads of three person is all transfered to one due to restructuring and retrenchment. the mgt will explain that this is only temporary, but like we all know, it slowly evolves into a state of permanacy. i guess from the boss's point of view, if i can pay one guy to do the job, why pay three guys??

    so one by one projects went by with no hiccups, but the stress of the workload is mounting, so what i did was to orchestrate a major hiccup. when something went wrong, they will review what when wrong. dangerous move, but if not you aint that easiy dispensible, this will work.

    well, i rather be do this than to suffer in silence.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Chaos
    so one by one projects went by with no hiccups, but the stress of the workload is mounting, so what i did was to orchestrate a major hiccup. when something went wrong, they will review what when wrong. dangerous move, but if not you aint that easiy dispensible, this will work.
    But wouldn't this cause negative reflection on the quality of your work? People will never understand the stress you went thru. They will only see the results and use it to reflect on your capabilities.

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    • #3
      I faced the same situation last year. The best thing you can do to avoid being labelled "unco-operative" is agree to help out but specify a timeline for your colleague's responsibilities to be handed back to her... maybe 6 months? In addition, ask your boss to provide training for your colleague to equip her with the skills that she will need to cope with these responsibilites. If she's still struggling after 6 months, you can come to an agreement with your boss on a phased in timeline when eventually your colleague will take over all her own responsibilites. If your colleague still has problems coping after training & help has been given to her, your manager needs to assess if the right decision has been made to move her to this job. Perhaps your colleague's skills & personality are not suited to the job that she's currently in?

      Good luck... it's not easy being in this situation but you can turn it around to your advantage. Willingness to help out and take on the extra responsibility should be highlighted during appraisals, rewarded during bonus time and a plus factor to be considered when you are up for promotion

      angie

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      • #4
        i think typical chinese is not an appropriate way to describe a boss.
        hmm, i worked with australians and basically they will also take advantage of u if they know u are good in something. *shrugs*
        i guess it is just human's instinct.

        as for ur colleage, i think u have to sit down and talk to her.
        like it or not, she has to take up her responsibility and not banging files on the table ( how rude is that?) and showing contempt (correct way of describing her?), this is certainly inmaturity (sp?) on her part.

        If she wants to take up additional classes/ courses outside work hours, then she has to get prepared for it (stress or no stress).
        It is the way life is and she shouldnt direct her anger towards u.

        if u have sat down and talk to ur direct supervisor, and this fellow dont listen, then it is time to go to ur boss.
        u are not trying to take over her line of command, but if the problem is not solved, then keeping quiet is not a solution.

        good luck in solving this

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        • #5
          Originally posted by fornight
          But wouldn't this cause negative reflection on the quality of your work? People will never understand the stress you went thru. They will only see the results and use it to reflect on your capabilities.
          for my case i did not face such a prob as my boss knows the quality of my work and what i am capable of doing. like i say, as long as you show you can handle it, they will let it be. the hiccup did caught his attention and in fear of another hiccup, he takes my "complaints" more seriously. i did talk to him and have warned him beforehand i am have no time for checks etc.

          another thing, you are currently doing checks for your colleague, don't check for her. just tell her you dont even have time to finish your own work. sounds cruel, but if you dont remove the float, she will never learn how to swim. my humble opinion.

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          • #6
            i have not really been working that long so my reply is pretty unqualified

            yes talking to your big boss is a good idea but from my experience, bosses dont like to hear problems, they want to hear solutions. so my suggestion is when you talk to your big boss, offer him a few options (not just one so he doesnt feel pressured to make the decision based on only one option)

            e.g. you could say that based on what you can see, Z does not seem to be able to cope with the workload so perhaps some work could be shifted over to the new girl or back to you, or hire an additional staff (based on assumed increased workload for all??) and other solutions. try to make it seem like you are not complaining about your work but rather that you are concerned over how things are working out

            all the best!!

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            • #7
              hmm... actually if i were your big boss i may just let her go, she's not very responsible is she if she threatens to quit just because she cant cope and she didnt even try to learn?

              hope everything turns out well for you *hugz*

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