Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cradle | Cot | Sling | Walker

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Which/ how much is the Aprica stroller, is it newborn to 3yrs, 3+kg is a VERY attractive weight! I was eyeing a Graco 4.7kg newborn to 3yrs $240, but figured I won't be using for the 1st 3 mths... I think anything from 3mths onwards is good enough as long as it's as LIGHT as possible! Know any brand/ model that fits the bill?

    You can either wait for the Isetan or Robinson sale. Robinson has better offer tho. The cheaper Aprica stroller is about $400 - $500. Combi is slightly cheaper, though not always. Some are made in China and the more expensive ones are made in Japan. I'll try to get you the address for the wholesaler. I think you may be able to get it at a much lower price.

    The strollers are usually for babies 3 months and up. You may like to get the pram if your want it for your newborn. After all, they can still use it until 3 years old (or max 18kg, for most prams). The prams are usually heavier and bulkier because of the wheels (bigger).

    HTH

    - Corina

    Comment


    • #32
      .............
      Last edited by Medusa; 15-11-2008, 01:32 AM. Reason: .................

      Comment


      • #33
        Hi Sky & All,

        There's nothing much to say about me really. I'm just a SAHM to 2 girls, age 6 (in July) and 3 yo. I joined CC since last May (Gosh, it's been a year!). :O A good friend of mine introduced me to this site. I must say I've learnt a lot from you girls. I know peanuts about makeups, hence, I have not done any contribution. So that's it.

        - Corina

        Comment


        • #34
          I am not going to get a walker for my baby either. I've seen my niece in it and that thing is a potential disaster! She would propel herself everywhere in it and we have to keep an eye on her constantly for fear that she would bump her head against something (esp the sharp corners of a table). Like Mel, I will put my baby in the playpen or even get a jumperoo.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Sky

            Moms, how good or bad is baby-walker really?
            [
            I will not let my baby use a walker, not even if I have a walker for free. Free exploration & freedom to move is very (and often overlooked) important to a baby's fine motor skill development, because it moves a baby further and much faster than his natural pace. Plus, a baby in a walker can't crawl, roll, stumble and freely explore his environment- all these are crucial to a baby who is new to the functions of his limbs and still learning how to coordinate and control them. And there's the danger factor- baby has access to places and heights he normall does not, and if caregiver is not free to supervise (which is probably why he's in a walker in the first place), he might topple something or knock himself. I want my baby to be able to explore as freely as possible, I truly believe that freedom to explore is one of the best way a child learns. I'm gonna get a playpen to 'house' her in when I'm busy cooking/toileting/washing.

            Comment


            • #36
              I have walker, cot, the sarong hammock, stroller (x2), sarong sling....

              Am pretty flexible with walker... but we were particular when it comes to choosing one. Got a wide base and a sturdy one (heavy enough... can't remember the weight) and most importantly when use, always read the instruction. Of course, I don't put my baby on the walker the entire day. I have also got a matress which I'll put my baby there for her to do her "floor exercise" - hahah like a little gymnast.

              In fact, I mind my baby alot once they become mobile. Teaching them along the way what to do and what not to do. If they make a mistake, they'll just have to learn from it.

              I don't have a playpen, simply because have no space to have 1 in the house... so, for that, the cot will do the job.

              Comment


              • #37
                African women walk away from idea of baby strollers Many see carriage as an impractical affront to tradition, saying kids `can't sit like lumps'

                By Emily Wax
                The Washington Post

                May 20, 2004

                NAIROBI, Kenya -- Irene Wambui can't imagine why anyone would buy a baby stroller. She sees it as a cold cage filled with useless rattles, cup holders and mirrored headlights. Imagine children being stuffed into such a contraption and pushed around town like some kind of pet.

                Yet here she is in the middle-class Westlands shopping district, trying to sell her store's newest merchandise, the four-wheeled plastic and metal tool of modern motherhood. But so far, strollers have been a flop in Nairobi, an affront to tradition.

                Across Africa, women can be seen carrying sleeping or sometimes giggly babies on their backs, swathed in cloth. The babies move to the sway of their mothers' hips, synchronized throughout the day, bending with them as they collect water or sweep the floor and rising again when the women stop to rest. They hang on as their mothers sell food in the market or pray at a church or mosque.

                The introduction of strollers and baby carriages, both known here by the British word "pram," horrifies traditionalists, even someone like Wambui, who sells them. The stroller is appearing in major cities around Africa but so far has not been a hit.

                "It's not so wonderful. In Africa, we just carry our children or let them roam. They can't sit like lumps," said Wambui, 24. "Besides, our roads aren't even good enough for these devices. If everyone had a pram it would cause jam-ups in traffic. Then we would be bad to our children and bad to our roads."

                Wambui's boss and manager, Zara Esmail, was pacing back and forth in front of the strollers one recent day. She said the store had sold only one in two months--to a visiting United Nations worker from Britain who complained later that she had been disappointed by the small selection.

                "In general I thought they would sell far better," Esmail said. Perhaps, she added, it's a question of directing more advertising toward middle-class, working moms.

                The stroller has sparked debate among African pediatricians who think the device may damage the relationship between a mother and a child.

                "The pram is the ultimate in pushing the baby away from you," said Frank Njenga, a child psychiatrist in Nairobi, Kenya's bustling capital. "The baby on the back is actually following the mother in warmth and comfort. The baby feels safer, and safer people are happier people."

                In the United States and Europe, strollers have long been controversial.
                Recently some doctors and child psychologists have blamed them for everything from pediatric obesity to low self-esteem later in life.

                Jane Clark, professor of kinesiology at the University of Maryland, said there is concern that Americans are overusing strollers for older children, causing toddlers to be less physically active. A movement among child advocates promotes the idea of carrying babies more and getting them out of their strollers.

                At the same time, Web sites and magazines in the U.S. and Europe dedicate a lot of space to the subject of choosing a style of stroller or carriage--front-to-back or side-by-side, with or without a lightweight titanium frame, pneumatic tires, rear suspension, mudflaps and/or battery-operated blinkers.
                Some
                European-made antique carriages are status symbols for celebrities such as Madonna and Celine Dion, who spent $2,600 on the classic Balmoral Pram, described by some Web reviewers as a tiny Humvee.

                Africans consider the traditional method of toting their children the only true version of day care. When it's time for feeding, the food is right there as a mother shifts her child to the front of her body, nestling the infant to her breast. The baby stroller could change all of that. But many people here said they thought the devices would be just another instance of Africans adopting the worst habits of industrialization.

                "There are customs from a hundred years ago that are not relevant today for Africans. Our challenge is to pick the good from the bad," said Carol Mandi, managing editor of EVE, a women's magazine. "But carrying on your back, well, that is just a wonderful custom that keeps the baby emotionally stable and lets the mother feel bonded. We can't stop being African women just because we are suddenly thrust into the modern world. What next? They will tell us to stop breast-feeding in public? No way."


                Copyright ? 2004, Chicago Tribune

                Comment


                • #38
                  I use the sling most times but the stroller comes in handy when my family goes out for long periods of time (the sling's with me at all times though in case baby wants to sleep). I only use the stroller when dh is around though, I've lost the skill thanks to the sling! I daren't use it on escalators these days...

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    ....................
                    Last edited by Medusa; 15-11-2008, 01:33 AM. Reason: ......................

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      I don't agree with that article either. It's not like we are keeping our baby in the stroller all day long. It's only meant to be used when we have to go out for a long stretch of time. I wouldn't even bother with a stroller if I was only out for a short while. I don't see how my baby will become obese or have a low self-esteem just because I use a stroller

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        I suppose African women who are used to carrying their babies around probably feel the stroller is irrelevant to them.

                        I do think the stroller can be useful at times, though (thinking about the zoo & Botanic Gardens - slinging the kid the whole time in those places, erm...maybe not!)

                        I do understand how some people might see the 'unnaturalness' of the stroller though.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Ariel
                          I don't agree with that article either. It's not like we are keeping our baby in the stroller all day long. It's only meant to be used when we have to go out for a long stretch of time. I wouldn't even bother with a stroller if I was only out for a short while. I don't see how my baby will become obese or have a low self-esteem just because I use a stroller
                          Some people do keep their kids in for a long time and push them around even when they're obviously too big for the stroller. I think the article probably refers to such cases but it does sound a tad extreme. Do you intend to sling or carry when you bring the little one out for short periods of time, Ariel?

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            This article is way too extreme IMO. I don't think using a stroller will cause any damage to my baby in any way, physically, psychologically, whateverly. Besides, I'm only gonna use the stroller when my baby can't walk yet. I definitely have no plans to strap her there against her will once she learns how to tod around. My baby will be getting as much freedom of movement as she needs anyway. Oh, just a personal thing, but I find it a little strange when I see kids aged 4-5 (or even older!) being pushed around in a stroller.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              ..............
                              Last edited by Medusa; 15-11-2008, 01:33 AM. Reason: ...................

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by mango
                                Oh, just a personal thing, but I find it a little strange when I see kids aged 4-5 (or even older!) being pushed around in a stroller.
                                YA! Me too. Doesn't look so good, huh?

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X