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  • Breast-Nurturing

    I am starting this thread to discuss breastfeeding Am calling it breast-nurturing instead because nursing your children is not just about nutrition!
    Last edited by makeupmag; 09-05-2004, 10:50 AM.

  • #2
    my SO's cousin couldnt breastfeed (apparently because she was too skinny) and they said she didnt have any milk and now her baby (who's already past 1 year) is still so skinny... Is there really such a thing that one is unable to breastfeed? How do u prevent that?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Pixash
      my SO's cousin couldnt breastfeed (apparently because she was too skinny) and they said she didnt have any milk and now her baby (who's already past 1 year) is still so skinny... Is there really such a thing that one is unable to breastfeed? How do u prevent that?
      There are rare cases where women really, medically, can't breastfeed. However, one is usually 'unable to breastfeed' because they don't have the right mindset to begin with, nor the determination, and sadly support For women in the latter category, the best way to make sure you can bf is to read up, surround yourselves with bf mothers and most importantly, have the conviction and determination to do it.

      I've helped a few women breastfeed. All succeeded but some faltered along the way. A few were discouraged becuase their baby didn't want to suckle. You know why? Because they gave baby formula in the first place! :roll: Their babies ended up getting nipple confusion and didn't nurse as well as they wanted them to. My biggest advice? DON'T GIVE FORMULA AT ALL IF YOU INTEND TO BREASTFEED.

      FYI, 'just one bottle' can hurt:
      http://www.breastfeeding.org/bfacts/bottle.html

      More:
      http://www.drjaygordon.com/bf/supplement.htm
      Last edited by makeupmag; 10-05-2004, 02:48 AM.

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      • #4
        My niece was bottle-fed at the hospital after my SIL delivered. I think the private ones here do that for the reasons the article mentioned. I know that in the public hospitals, they don't bottle-feed the babies at all.

        Anyway, when my niece came home, she wouldn't suckle and was crying so loudly and desperately out of hunger that my SIL bottle-fed her (with milk pumped from her breast). After that, the baby simply refused to be breast-fed and slowly my SIL's milk supply dwindled until there was none, in a matter of a few days only after her delivery. She's the very skinny type so maybe her milk supply wasn't enough to start with but who knows.

        When my turn comes, I am going to insist that the hospital let me breastfeed my baby after delivery. It's not going to be easy, I know but I am determined to make it work.

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        • #5
          Hi Mag,
          I'd answer your question in the other thread about my thoughts on breastfeeding, here

          I'm not exactly militant die-die must breastfeed, but I've read up on it and am preparing to give it a good shot.

          Hence IF baby is perfectly healthy (ie. not jaundiced, not undernourished or whatever), I do not want the hospital to bottle-feed the baby, or feed formula for the 1st few days when my milk comes in slow because baby still has resources in him/ her for the first few days. Just very stressful facing a hungry baby.

          If I can get breastfeeding in good swing after a few days, I do not want formula milk as "supplement" night feeding. There's no need, and I don't want to introduce allergents present in formula milk if I can help it.

          I do not want to feed my baby water either because that will reduce demand for breastmilk (since breastmilk mainly composed of water anyway... when much older can always train to drink water, no worries).

          I am keen on expressed breastmilk feeding at some later point though because I want my hubby to be part of the feeding experience. I also would like to monitor how much baby is drinking. This is to avoid baby being shoved to me for "feeding" every single time it cries and to avoid me feeling like a milked cow.

          If for some reasons breastfeeding is way too difficult, say, pain/ discomfort that is more than I'm willing to bear, then I may give it up because a happy mummy is a happy baby- the last I want is for it to be excruciating experience for both of us. But it will solely be my decision.

          I do not want and will not tolerate nurses/ mother/ mother-in-law over-riding my decisions (not to formula feed baby in hospital unless medically warranted). I also made clear to hubby that if anyone tries anything funny like giving contrary instructions while I am sleeping, I will reject the baby (this is an empty threat of course) and that person can jolly well breastfeed my baby herself! I will also not tolerate snide (even if well-meaning) remarks about my milk supposedly insufficient, my milk being too much and supposedly "watery", that I'm starving my baby, supposedly giving my baby diarrhoea (since breastfed babies have watery poo), supposedly giving my baby asthma (since I WILL continue to drink COLD water), supposedly giving non-nutritious milk (since breastfed babies digest and feed more often) or anything else the imagination can conjure.

          I've already conveyed all these to my hubby, mother, mother-in-law so they know what I want and also to prepare them for what to expect... the only problem I forsee is my mother-in-law, she's liable to argue with me even if I continue my campaign til I deliver. My temper and particularly my tongue, is not well-behaved when stressed/ provoked/ agitated.

          Good thing hubby has assured me that the baby is mine, I can do whatever I deem fit.
          Last edited by Medusa; 10-05-2004, 01:57 PM.

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          • #6
            Wow, Mel you did so much more reading up than I ever did with my first baby! Fantastic.

            Re: jaundice, here's a good article to read about bfg & jaundice:
            http://www.kellymom.com/newman/jaundice_01-03.html

            This was one of my issues, I personally wanted to know the relationship b/w the two and whether my milk could exacerbate jaundice. To my relief, the answer was no

            I am glad you mentioned the water bit. Many mothers are sadly misled into thinking water is important. But it's not and can even be detrimental to the baby's health.
            http://www.stlouischildrens.org/arti...nts.asp?ID=171

            Till today my little one stilll has not had a single drop of water and he's thriving!

            Expressing your milk is a good way to have some *me* time as well, you can go shopping! But don't stay out too long, you might get engorged

            By the way, another way to monitor whether your baby is getting enough is to see if he/she is wetting enough diapers. Some babies drink less expressed milk and more directly, so expressing may not tell you exactly the babies' intake.

            I actually put up a breastfeeding sign on my baby's cot in the hospital that stated clearly no water, no supplements were to be given to my baby (and there was even a threat of legal action should such a thing occur ) I printed it off my parenting list files, if you would like it I'd be glad to send you a copy. In the end, my baby slept with me on the hospital bed, and was with me at all times so the nurses didn't have a chance to feed him other stuff, even if they wanted to. Anyhow Mt A is rather pro bfg so no worries there!

            So good to see that you've done your homework and more. It was fab reading this post! Do bear in mind that you may be very tired after birthing so your dear hubby is your fortress - he will be the one to tell the nurses what (not) to do and to adhere to your wishes. So prepare him

            Feel free to drop me a pm if I can help in *any* way (although I have a feeling you've got it down pat!). Hugs!

            PS: I drink cold water ALL the time
            Last edited by makeupmag; 10-05-2004, 02:33 PM.

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            • #7
              I kept wondering, I know in some cases BM does not come in until a few days later, and I know that techinically, healthy babies have enough reserve in their bodies to not need milk for couple of days until the BM comes in becuase the mother can feed baby colostrum, and the suckling will stimulate the flow, right? But my concern is, what if the colostrum also doesn't come in? And there's not a drop of anything for baby to feed on, then how? The baby would have to go w/o even water? If this happens to me, surely its fine to feed baby a weeny bit of water using a spoon (to prevent nipple confusion)? Shouldn't hurt much right?

              I've opted for single room, and yup, I'll request for baby to room in with me (bonding time with me and hubby!). And I'll make sure no one (and I mean no one :note: ) feeds my baby except me.

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              • #8
                I would like to know whether a Hep B carrier mum is able to breastfeed. TIA!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tane
                  I would like to know whether a Hep B carrier mum is able to breastfeed. TIA!
                  If you're a Hep B carrier, your gyne will give your baby a special vaccine to protect her right after birth (to be administered w/in 12 hours or something like that), and this gives your baby the antibodies she'll need so that you will not pass the virus to her. And I don't think Hep B virus can be passed via BF, so yes, you can BF.

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                  • #10
                    last week I was at TMC, and I saw the nurses bottle-feeding the newborns! Hmmm...... Well breastfeeding does seem like the best option because you save on milk formula and u dont need to worry about heating and sterilising bottles everyday..even my SO is pro-breastfeeding. He keeps stressing that breastfed babies are stronger and bigger and healthier...

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the link to the website, mag! I've printed out all the handouts regarding breastfeeding, for bedside reading I have to find out as much as I can about breastfeeding so that I can do it the right way.

                      Note to self:
                      - Ask the hospital not to bottle-feed my baby
                      - Request for the baby to room in with me :note:

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                      • #12
                        http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_700634.html
                        I realise this may be offensive but if we can keep an open mind- considering this particular case's circumstances.

                        Did you know that baby in your womb forms as a FEMALE first, ie. with nipples and then the lower genitals protrudes to become the male genitals if the chromosomes direct it?

                        Anyway, I'd be starting with a manual breastpump about $100 budget... was just jesting with hubby that if I splurged on a much more expensive model and gave up on breastfeeding- hubby who's more money-conscious would probably attempt to take over hahaha.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ariel
                          Note to self:
                          - Ask the hospital not to bottle-feed my baby
                          - Request for the baby to room in with me :note:
                          The midwife will ask you are you gg to fully breastfeed/partial breastfeed/fully bottlefeed after you have given birth.

                          If you opt for fully breastfeed, they will not introduce bottle to your newborn.

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                          • #14
                            Hi Lilo, unfortunately, that's not the practice here. I understand that only the public hospitals are letting the mothers breastfeed their babies but private hospitals usually bottle-feed the babies after delivery, in order to let the mothers rest.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Ariel
                              Hi Lilo, unfortunately, that's not the practice here. I understand that only the public hospitals are letting the mothers breastfeed their babies but private hospitals usually bottle-feed the babies after delivery, in order to let the mothers rest.
                              you mean in Malaysia?

                              But if its private hospitals, wouldn't they listen to their patients' requests?

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