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  • Ligation

    http://www.fwhc.org/birth-control/tubalig.htm

    Any mommies have enough children already, and had ligation ? Any impact physically or physcologically ? How much did it cost and how long did you have to rest after that ?

    I am currently on birth control pills, but I am so worried that I will forget to take the pill. Other forms of birth control like IUDs only last for a few years, and still have to remember to do again. I am terribly forgetful so don't want to risk it.

  • #2
    I actually feel very strongly about women having tubal ligation. Men can have vasectomies - it's a very superficial procedure, less than a week's downtime. But Asian men willing to do it are rare. It's mainly psychological. I don't see why women should get cut open for pelvic surgery, no matter how minor the procedure is in terms of all surgery. For men it's just a nick in the skin. Finish rant.

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    • #3
      i think it's pretty extreme... why don't you make an appointment with the O&G dr to discuss implants? i think they can call you up once the efficacy period is up to remind you

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      • #4
        Tubal ligation or vasectomies are meant for people who are certain they do not want more kids. I don't see it as being extreme - it's a very viable option. Family planning is pretty important these days, and most people are certain of the number of kids they want. People who may want more kids usually do not opt for these methods and then live to regret it when they want to try for another child. I personally think that hormonal contraception is detrimental in the long run. Implants or depo injections are progesterone-based, and not everyone can tolerate its use. Just because it seems more long term doesn't mean it is. IUDs typically last 3 years, the newer ones last longer. But because of the inflammation it causes which is presumably also the mechanism of contraception, the risk of cancer is increased.

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        • #5
          i do mean it's extreme in the sense that one would have to undergo a surgical procedure with the outcome being almost permanent. personally, i think that there are other options that may cause less psychological impact in the long-term. unless you're 101% dead sure you don't want any more children and wouldn't regret it, i wouldn't recommand it, simply because there are too many things in life that are constantly prone to changes

          as for risks, all procedures and products carry risks and side effects, you have to sit down with the O&G dr to assess all of them. getting information online is all well and good but at the end of the day, i think you still need to talk it through with your dr and family

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          • #6
            I have already spoken to my family quite a few times. My mother said that I should have done it when I gave birth to my second baby, it is so troublesome to do it now. My husband didn't like the idea of me being "mutilated", but he is also scared of having more babies so he supported my decision.

            It costs money to see a gynae, and what they can advise is the technical details, which I can read from the internet. Actually I am more interested in the emotional impact.

            As for vasectomy, I do not want to impose that on my husband. What if I divorce him ? I don't want to deprive him of the chance of starting a new family

            Having been through 2 childbirth with no epidural, I certainly don't want to go through it again. But the most important thing is that I want to devote the little time that I have (since I am working full time) to my 2 little darlings.

            I don't think of ligation as being extreme. If I want to get pregant again, I can always use IVF.

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            • #7
              I like the way you think re: vasectomy. To be honest, I'd get my tubes tied if and when I have my required number of children. (But the risk of ectopic pregnancy is significantly higher - you will be surprised to know how common it is - every woman who comes into ER with abdominal pain will get a pregnancy test and an ultrasound if it's positive. It kills if undetected.) I just wouldn't trust a man with contraception and I've totally given up on finding a guy who will willingly have it. Some kind of castration complex going on. It's 75% reversible, so if a guy wants to get it reversed it's so much better than getting a tubal ligation reversed.

              Tubal ligation is not a major procedure, and there are several ways to have it, but the website you posted seems to oversimplify the downtime. I've obviously never had any pelvic surgery done, so all my knowledge is from books. From friends and actually talking to patients, the average time for the skin wounds to start healing is about 10 days, and even then it hurts - my friend had a laparoscopy for some other thing and her wounds wouldn't stick for two weeks, which can be traumatic cos' you just never know and there's not a thing the doctor can do because that's just how your body works. As for emotional impact, if you aren't fussed about surgery it's not such a big deal since you already know. Just so you know, for laparoscopy, they make a small nick in your tummy, stick this really long pump inside to fill it up with carbon dioxide and put the camera in. Then they make a couple more nicks. It makes a "pop" when they do it, kinda like popping a balloon. There are several anesthetic options which you have to discuss with your OB/GYN - but generally anesthesia these days is pretty safe even with GA. Safer than taking a car trip.

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              • #8
                Tamarind, have your tried the natural way of family planning using the Billings method.
                Quite successful, just need a bit of work like charting and abstinence.

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                • #9
                  A friend was commenting what her gynae told her about ligation. The female reproductive system is like a television set. Just imagine what happens to the TV set when you don't switch it on. Short of breaking down, it turns "mouldy"

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                  • #10
                    I highly advise against any rhythm method of contraception. The rate of pregnancies from these is astounding. I'm sure anyone's who's had an "unplanned" baby from one of these (not that I have) will feel the same way. There are published figures on the main methods of contraception. If you're going to use the rhythm method, you might as well use condoms. When used correctly condoms prevent up to 97% of pregnancies.

                    In addition, the pattern of cervical mucus is used mainly to advise couples actually trying for a baby, to recognize when there is highest probability of fertilization. Not the other way round. No sane OB/GYN will recommend it for contraception.

                    Also, the medical risks of tubal ligation are well-documented and I'm sure an OB/GYN will give a better explanation than merely going moldy. It does not affect sexual activity, and there are few detrimental effects apart from the higher risk of ectopics.
                    Last edited by Aphrael; 14-10-2005, 11:14 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Aphrael, I believe my friend's gynae brought the point across very effectively, cos she changed her mind about ligation. Sometimes it's the way of communicating the point across to the patients that helps the patient make an enlightened.

                      Family planning is a very personal decision best left to individuals to decide, but the gynae one goes with is important, best to pick one who's philosophy is similar to ones. Too much info. can sometimes be detrimental and cloud one's decision.

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                      • #12
                        I am all for family-planning. It is only responsible to have the right number of kids so that as parents we can provide for the overall development of our offsprings. It's really a fine balance between over-providing for the kids thereby spoiling them rotten with worldly comforts, and giving enough that they will grow up wholesome individuals.

                        *sigh* I really feel sorry for those mothers who found themselves saddled with more kids and responsibilities than they can handle, esp for those mothers who gave up their careers, social life, personal development to raise their families. Short-term it appears they have traded everything, sometimes even their own lives just to nurture their offsprings. What gives them hope and comfort is perhaps the future where they watch their kids grow up and return the same kind of love and piety. But realistically speaking, if anyone asks me, I won't expect my own kid to take care and provide for me in my old age. I would be happy if he/she grows up a responsible and useful citizen to the world.

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                        • #13
                          The thing is OB/GYNs are very personal as well - I know of doctors who bring their own personal and religious beliefs into their practice, which in fact does cloud judgement. I know of GPs who wouldn't prescribe OCPs or morning after pills because they're Catholic, and I find that really unacceptable in my book. I have learnt to listen to my patients and note what they need instead of pushing numbers onto them. But yes, everyone has to decide for themselves what they really want. Informed decisions all the way. I really don't recommend the rhythm method though.

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                          • #14
                            Ah Aphrael you GP ah?

                            Ok, maybe must use the latest "Sympto-thermal Double Check" method.
                            Billings and Rhythm methods, both outdated already.
                            Ref: http://www.naturalfertility.co.nz/mth_tradmod.htm

                            Religion aside, I'm all for natural family planning, drug-free, procedure-free (if nature permits, and humanly possible)

                            Originally posted by Aphrael
                            I really don't recommend the rhythm method though.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Marge
                              *sigh* I really feel sorry for those mothers who found themselves saddled with more kids and responsibilities than they can handle, esp for those mothers who gave up their careers, social life, personal development to raise their families. Short-term it appears they have traded everything, sometimes even their own lives just to nurture their offsprings. What gives them hope and comfort is perhaps the future where they watch their kids grow up and return the same kind of love and piety. But realistically speaking, if anyone asks me, I won't expect my own kid to take care and provide for me in my old age. I would be happy if he/she grows up a responsible and useful citizen to the world.
                              You have written exactly what's on my mind ! Totally agree with everything you wrote above.

                              Thanks for suggesting the methods. However, I am terribly lazy and forgetful, can't even trust myself to take a pill everyday. So your methods are too risky for me.

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